2016 Annual Report

Building a world with more
evidence and less poverty

IPA Annual Report 2016 Building a World with More Evidence and Less Poverty

2016 Annual Report

Building a world with more
evidence and less poverty

Dear Friends,

IPA stands at the forefront of a movement to build rigorous evidence and ensure it is used to improve the lives of people living in poverty. In 2016, we started 75 new studies and continued our efforts to share research findings and grow our visibility through 70 events across the world.

We saw more research translate into action through the scale-up of successful programs such as Living Goods, a community health model that reduced child mortality in Uganda, No Lean Season, a financial incentive program that improved income security in Bangladesh, and TextDirect, an organization scaling up text message reminders to take malaria medication.

In the past year, we became increasingly engaged with decision-makers in the creation of evidence and in building a culture of evidence-informed decision-making around the world. These engagements

ranged in size and scope, from advising government officials working on social protection programs in Guyana, to hosting a policy forum on evidence in agriculture in Kenya, to presenting baseline findings on a maternal cash transfer study to government officials in Myanmar.

We continue to work with some of the most respected academics in the world, who help us understand not just what works, but why and how. These research partners make critical contributions to their fields and they bring rigor, integrity, and independence to our work. We are proud to collaborate with each and every one.

We also continue to influence global debates and communicate findings about what works and what doesn’t. This past year, we authored more policy publications than ever before and saw our work featured in many respected news outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, The Washington Post, and The Economist.

Looking ahead, we are becoming an organization of learning: we learn not only from our successes, but from our failures, and we are sharing those lessons publicly. In 2016, IPA founder Dean Karlan published a new book, Failing in the Field, with co-author Jacob Appel, highlighting lessons IPA has learned over the past decade and a half of conducting field work. We will continue to share our successes and failures in the coming years, so please stay tuned.

As you will see on the following pages, IPA’s work is more influential and impactful than ever. We look forward to seeing what the next year brings forth, and we hope you will join us.

Annie Duflo

Annie Duflo
Executive Director

Dean Karlan

Dean Karlan
Founder

IPA in the Media

IPA was featured in dozens of news sources in 2016, including:

What We Do

We discover and promote effective solutions to global poverty problems.

Since our founding in 2002, IPA has worked with over 575 leading academics to conduct over 650 evaluations in 51 countries. This research has informed hundreds of successful programs that now impact millions of individuals worldwide. Our long-term field presence in 20 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America enables us to build the strong relationships needed to conduct high-quality research and influence decision-makers.

2016 IPA Offices Map

WEST AFRICA
Burkina Faso
Côte d’Ivoire
Ghana
Liberia
Mali
Sierra Leone

EAST AFRICA
Kenya

Malawi
Rwanda
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia

LATIN AMERICA
Bolivia

Colombia
Dominican Republic
Paraguay
Peru

ASIA
Bangladesh
Myanmar
Philippines

Headquarters
United States

Program Areas

Our Program Areas

Who We Work With

Who We Work With

Our Approach

Develop
Number 1 Develop
Develop

Connect researchers with partners and funders to answer critical questions, and help design innovative solutions

Evaluate Icon
Number 2 Evaluate
Evaluate

Rigorously test programs to find out what works and why

Replicate
Number 3 Replicate
Replicate

Test successful programs in new contexts to see if results hold elsewhere

Influence
Number 4 Influence
Influence

Build partnerships and communicate findings to decision-makers

Scale
Number 5 Scale
Scale

Support the expansion of programs that have been proven to work

Example: Graduating the Ultra-Poor

Number 1 Develop
Develop

Researchers partnered with organizations in seven countries to test the impact of a “big push” livelihoods program.

Numbers 2 and 3 Evaluate and Replicate
Evaluate and Replicate

IPA launched a multi-year field operation to track the program’s impact in six countries. The program was shown to improve income, consumption, nutrition, and have other positive impacts in multiple countries.

Number 4 Influence
Influence

IPA staff, researchers, and partners disseminated results and supported governments to adapt the program to suit their contexts.

Number 5 Scale
Scale

The program is being expanded to reach over 2.5 million households in 25 countries. As it scales, we continue to test and adjust the approach.

Develop
Number 1 Develop
Develop

Connect researchers with partners and funders to answer critical questions, and help design innovative solutions

Evaluate Icon
Number 2 Evaluate
Evaluate

Rigorously test programs to find out what works and why

Replicate
Number 3 Replicate
Replicate

Test successful programs in new contexts to see if results hold elsewhere

Influence
Number 4 Influence
Influence

Build partnerships and communicate findings to decision-makers

Scale
Number 5 Scale
Scale

Support the expansion of programs that have been proven to work

Example: Graduating the Ultra-Poor

Number 1 Develop
Develop

Researchers partnered with organizations in seven countries to test the impact of a “big push” livelihoods program.

Numbers 2 and 3 Evaluate and Replicate
Evaluate and Replicate

IPA launched a multi-year field operation to track the program’s impact in six countries. The program was shown to improve income, consumption, nutrition, and have other positive impacts in multiple countries.

Number 4 Influence
Influence

IPA staff, researchers, and partners disseminated results and supported governments to adapt the program to suit their contexts.

Number 5 Scale
Scale

The program is being expanded to reach over 2.5 million households in 25 countries. As it scales, we continue to test and adjust the approach.

Graduating the Ultra Poor Photo

Connecting Evidence to Policy

IPA is collaborating with government partners in 20 countries to create rigorous evidence and apply it to policy. Here are some highlights of these collaborations from 2016.

Results

Improving Seasonal Income Security in Bangladesh

A small incentive—about the cost of a bus ticket—encouraged people to migrate for work during the lean season, leading to improved income security for their families and their communities.

Three hundred million of the world’s rural poor suffer from seasonal income insecurity, which often occurs between planting and harvest. During this season, families typically miss meals for a two- to three-month period. Migration for work during the lean season has the potential to increase income and improve food security for rural families. However, in places such as Rangpur, Bangladesh, people have traditionally stayed home and risked hunger rather than go to towns to work.

IPA worked with researchers in 2008 to evaluate the impact of providing information or small financial incentives worth about $8.50—the cost of a bus ticket—on migration rates and household welfare in Rangpur. The study found that households offered either a grant or loan to migrate were substantially more likely to send someone to work outside the village during the lean season, and those families consumed more calories than those not offered the incentives. Many also chose to re-migrate on their own a year later.

From 2014-2016 IPA evaluated the program at scale in the same context and the study not only confirmed these findings, but also showed that larger-scale emigration increases wages and work hours in the village of origin.

Bryan, Gharad, Shyamal Chowdhury, and Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak. “Underinvestment in a profitable technology: The case of seasonal migration in Bangladesh.” Econometrica 82, no. 5 (2014): 1671-1748.
Amount Spent on Food Each Month. Households offered incentives to migrate spent more on food each month than households not offered incentives.
How It Works. A small incentive nudged families to send a household member to a nearby town for seasonal work and the worker remitted money home, improving income security for the household during the lean season.

Policy Impact: Scale-Up in Bangladesh

Evidence Action, a global development organization that focuses on scaling rigorously-evaluated interventions, has designed a program called No Lean Season based on these findings. In partnership with the Bangladeshi NGO RDRS and IPA, they are gradually testing and expanding the program and evaluating it at scale. Over the next four years, as many as 310,000 low-income households may be reached by the program. If it proves to be beneficial and cost-effective, Evidence Action plans to eventually reach millions of people with the program.

Reducing Child Mortality with an Entrepreneurial Community Health Model in Uganda

Door-to-door community health workers
reduced child mortality in poor communities.

Despite improvements in under-five child mortality, an estimated 5.9 million children worldwide died in 2015, more than half due to preventable or easily treatable conditions. In Uganda, two NGOs—Living Goods and BRAC—created a community health worker program with the aim of improving access to and adoption of simple, proven health interventions among low-income households.

The door-to-door community health workers provide health education and access to basic health products for low-income households. This model also aims to

create sustainable livelihoods for the workers, who can earn an income through profits from product sales and small, performance-based incentives for visiting households with pregnant women and newborn children.

IPA worked with researchers to conduct a randomized evaluation of the program in Uganda over three years. Researchers estimated that the community-health-worker model reduced under-five mortality by 27 percent and infant mortality by 33 percent.

The study also showed that the program improved health knowledge and led to higher reported preventative health measures. Households with newborns in program villages were also more likely to have received follow-up visits, compared to households that didn’t receive the program.

Björkman Nyqvist, Martina, Andrea Guariso, Jakob Svensson, and David Yanagizawa-Drott. “Effect of a micro entrepreneur-based community health delivery program on under-five mortality in Uganda: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.” (2016).

“The power and quality of [IPA’s] research has persuaded policymakers, replication partners, and major funders to back a rapid scale-up of the approach. As a result, Living Goods’ reach has tripled to 5 million people served. Proof positive that IPA’s research can lead to disruptive change for those most in need.”

Chuck Slaughter, Founder of Living Goods, 2016

Policy Impact: Scale-Up in Uganda

These results persuaded policymakers and funders to scale up the community-health-worker model, enabling Living Goods to expand the program to reach millions across Uganda and to bring the successful model to Kenya. From 2016-2019, IPA is evaluating this program at scale.

Living Goods Community Health Worker

Empowering Women and Reducing Poverty with Mobile Money Access in Kenya

Access to mobile banking lifted 2 percent of the population out of poverty.

M-PESA Business Transaction

In Kenya, until recently, relatively few people had access to banking services. Most people relied on intermediaries, like a driver or a neighbor going to town, to send cash to someone—an expensive and risky practice. The advent of a mobile money system called M-PESA has changed that.

In 2007, the company Safaricom introduced a mobile money platform that allowed users to send and receive money with their mobile phones using a simple text message. Now, in 96 percent of Kenyan households, M-PESA is used by at least one person,

who deposits and withdraws money from their account through a network of local agents. By 2014, there were 110,000 mobile money agents in the country and only 2,600 ATMs.

Over six years, researchers conducted a natural experiment to track the economic progress of households as the M-PESA mobile money service expanded. The study found that access to the mobile money system increased per capita consumption levels and lifted 194,000 households, or 2 percent of Kenyan households, out of poverty.

The impacts, which were more pronounced for households headed by women, appear to be driven by changes in financial behavior—in particular, increased financial resilience and savings.

Suri, Tavneet, and William Jack. “The long-run poverty and gender impacts of mobile money.” Science 354, no. 6317 (2016): 1288-1292.

What Are the Impacts of Digital Finance Elsewhere?

The promising results motivated IPA and lead researcher Tavneet Suri to track the impacts of mobile financial services in other countries.

Policy Lessons

  • Basic financial services—including the ability to safely store, send, and transact money—have the potential
    to boost economic well-being.
  • For women, the route out of poverty may not be more capital, but rather financial inclusion at a more basic level: the ability to manage existing financial resources.
  • Mobile banking could have similar impacts in other countries with very limited and far-flung banking services, but more research (see map) is needed to determine impacts in other contexts. 

Teacher Training for Better
Quality Preschools in Ghana

An in-service training and coaching program for preschool teachers improved teaching and children’s school readiness, but adding on a parental awareness program reversed some of the positive effects.

Ghana Preschool Students Learning

Early childhood represents a crucial stage for development. During these early years, children form the basis for future learning, and investments in early childhood can have high returns in terms of future educational attainment and well-being. One effective way to improve early childhood development is through high-quality early childhood education.

In Ghana, great progress has been made in increasing enrollment in pre-primary education, but the quality of preschools is low. In Accra, researchers examined two approaches to raise the quality of pre-primary education: training kindergarten teachers, and raising parental awareness about the benefits of early learning and investing in their children’s learning.

The study found that the teacher training improved the number of the play-based, child-friendly activities teachers used and improved the quality of teacher-child interactions. The program also reduced teacher burnout, as well as teacher turnover in the private sector. The in-service training also led to an improvement in children’s school readiness, primarily in the area of social-emotional development. The program was found to be equally effective in the public and private sector.

However, adding the parental awareness program to the teacher training counteracted the positive impacts of teachers’ support for student expression and children’s school readiness.

Careful consideration and further research is needed to understand why this approach to parental engagement had this effect, and what approaches would be more effective.

In 2017, IPA is actively engaging with public and private education providers in Ghana, as well as large-scale implementers and donors, who have expressed interest in scaling up the teacher training.

Aber, J. Lawrence, Jere R. Behrman, Sharon Wolf. “The Impacts of Teacher Training and Parental Education on Kindergarten Quality in Ghana.” Innovations for Poverty Action. Accessed June 16, 2017 at https://www.poverty-action.org/study/improving-kindergarten-quality-ghana
Researchers randomly assigned schools to receive an in-service teacher training, both the teacher training and a parental awareness program, or neither. The programs were comprised of: In-service Teacher Training, including first: a five-day training, plus refresher trainings four and eight months later; and second: ongoing monitoring and coaching. The other program was a Parental Awareness Program, including first: Videos screened during educational sessions held at PTA meetings, and second: Discussion focused on play-based learning, parents’ role in child learning, and encouraging parent-teacher and parent-school communication. The in-service teacher training improved teaching and children’s school readiness. The parental awareness program reversed some of the positive effects.

Policy Lessons:

  • Trainings could be useful for teachers in both public and private schools since the program was found to be equally effective in both sectors. In the private sector in particular, investments in professional development can also reduce teacher burnout and improve teacher retention significantly.
  • Although the teacher training improved classroom quality and children’s social-emotional development, improvements to the program may be needed to also improve children’s early academic outcomes.

Improving Financial Behavior with
a Tablet-Based App in Colombia

A customizable app that allowed people to learn financial concepts at their own pace, from anywhere, helped women make better financial choices and save more.

Improving Financial Behavior with a Tablet-Based App in Colombia

A customizable app that allowed people to learn financial concepts at their own pace, from anywhere, helped women make better financial choices and save more.

Women Using Financial Education LISTA Tablet

Three-fourths of the newly banked global poor—an estimated 375 to 600 million people—have never received any form of financial training, and, in theory, financial education could help them make sound financial choices. However, one-size-fits-all financial education programs have not been very effective on average. Some evidence suggests that customizing financial education to the needs, interests, and location of each participant works better, but finding a cost-effective way to customize financial training has been a challenge.

Fundación Capital, an international social enterprise, designed the LISTA Initiative to address this issue. Their financial training app integrates audio, video,

and gaming elements in an attempt to overcome literacy barriers and make the learning experience entertaining. Community leaders circulate tablets among community members and participants are able to learn from the comfort of their own homes, study at their own pace, and customize their own learning.

In Colombia, researchers worked with IPA and the Colombian government’s Ministry of Social Prosperity to test the impact of the LISTA Initiative on financial knowledge and attitudes, informal and formal financial practices, and use of financial products by beneficiaries of the country’s conditional cash transfer program, the large majority of whom are women.

The study found that the initiative improved financial knowledge, attitudes toward formal financial services, adoption of financial practices, and financial outcomes. Low-income women provided with access to the tablet-based app were also more likely to set savings goals and teach others to use ATMs than women who didn’t have access to the tablets. Moreover, the women saved more money.

Attanasio, Orazio, Matthew Bird, and Pablo Lavado. “Tablet-Based Financial Education in Colombia: Highlights,” April 2017.
Woman Using LISTA Financial Education Tablet

Policy Impact: Scale-Up in Five Countries

The Colombian government has adopted the initiative, and these findings have supported increased funding for the scale-up of the LISTA Initiative in other countries as well. As of mid-2017, Fundación Capital was scaling up to reach 500,000 people in Colombia, 50,000 in the Dominican Republic, 34,000 in Honduras, 25,000 in Brazil, and 20,000 in Mexico.

More Results

In 2016, we shared results from more than 30 IPA evaluations with the world. In addition to those on the previous pages, here are some other noteworthy findings.

VSLAs Uganda Surveyor

A low-cost village bank model boosted financial inclusion and women’s empowerment in Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda.1

Access to Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs)­—a model where members pool their money together to form a village bank—led to improved financial inclusion, business outcomes, and women’s empowerment. There was also evidence of improved resilience: in villages affected by drought, households had better food security and higher incomes.

Allowing farmers to pay for insurance at harvest substantially increased demand in Kenya.2

Giving sugarcane farmers the option to buy crop insurance at planting time and pay at harvest time, several months later, increased demand for insurance by 67 percentage points, relative to farmers who had to pay upfront. This simple change in timing worked much better than a discount: reducing the cost of insurance by a third didn’t increase demand at all. These results suggest that, with present-biased or cash-strapped farmers, timing may be more effective than subsidies at increasing uptake of farm insurance.

Financial incentives to delay childbearing were more effective than a girls’ empowerment program in Bangladesh.3

A six-month girls’ empowerment program—similar to many girls’ empowerment programs implemented worldwide­—kept girls in school longer, but didn’t have any effect on child marriage or early childbearing four and a half years after the program ended. However, offering a financial incentive to delay marriage reduced child marriage by 10 percentage points, reduced early pregnancy by 5 percentage points, and increased participation in school by 6 percentage points.

Industrial jobs didn’t help unemployed Ethiopians earn more money and brought substantial health risks.4

A year after unemployed young men and women were offered industrial jobs, their wages were no higher than those not offered the jobs. The industrial jobs also doubled serious health problems and worker turnover was high. In contrast, unemployed young men and women offered an entrepreneurship program earned higher wages a year later, without negative health consequences.

Electronic payments increased the state’s capacity to deliver welfare programs in India, leading to a reduction in poverty for the greater community.5

When the government used a biometric “smartcard” system to deliver payments to government beneficiaries, the payments process was faster, more predictable, and less corrupt, without decreasing program access. The change had large positive impacts on the greater community due to an increase in wages in the private sector. It led to a 13 percent increase in earnings of low-income households and a 17 percent reduction in an income-based measure of poverty, without increasing program costs.

1  Karlan, Dean, Beniamino Savonitto, Bram Thuysbaert, and Christopher Udry. “Impact of savings groups on the lives of the poor.Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017): 201611520.

2  Casaburi, Lorenzo, and Jack Willis. “Time vs. State in Insurance: Experimental Evidence from Contract Farming in Kenya.” (2016).

5  Muralidharan, Karthik, Paul Niehaus, and Sandip Sukhtankar. “Building state capacity: Evidence from biometric smartcards in India.” The American Economic Review 106, no. 10 (2016): 2895-2929.

Muralidharan, Karthik, Paul Niehaus, and Sandip Sukhtankar. “General equilibrium effects of (improving) public employment programs: Experimental evidence from India.Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego, processed (2016).

Funders

Anonymous (2)
AESTUS Foundation
American Express Foundation*
American International Group (AIG)*
Asociación de Utilidad Pública Juntos por la Educación
ATASS Foundation
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Business for Social Responsibility (BSR)
CAF, Development Bank of Latin America
Center for Effective Global Action (at the University of California, Berkeley)
Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)
Chevron*
Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF)
Conservation Strategy Fund
Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University
Dell Employee Engagement Fund, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation*
Deutsche Bank US*
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)
DoubleXEconomy, LLC
Douglas B. Marshall, Jr. Family Foundation
Duke University
Echidna Giving
Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)
European Research Council grant agreement n° 284384 – NETWORKS
First Dollar Foundation
Flora Family Foundation
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Ford Foundation
Franci Neely Foundation
Fund for Shared Insight
Fundación Arturo y Enrica Sesana

GOAL Relief and Development Organization
Google.org
Group for the Analysis of Development (GRADE)
Grupo Old Mutual en Colombia
Henry E. Niles Foundation, Inc.
Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation
ideas42
Innovative Methods and Metrics for Agriculture and Nutrition Actions (IMMANA)
Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)
International Development Research Centre (Canada)
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
International Growth Centre (IGC)
International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)
International Rescue Committee
Jacobs Foundation
JMT Charitable Foundation*
John Fell OUP Research Fund
John Templeton Foundation
Kelly Family Cuidiú Foundation
Koe Koe Tech
Laidir Foundation
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
The Marple Charitable Trust
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MetLife Foundation
Michigan State University
Millennium Challenge Corporation
Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerables, Perú
Ministerio de la Producción, Perú
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
National Science Foundation, Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences

National University of Singapore
New York University, Department of Politics
Nuru Energy
Omidyar Network
Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP)
Pepsico Employee Engagement Fund, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation*
Population Services International
Princeton University
SALOG S.A – Salud y Logística
Save the Children
Social Impact
Stanford University
Symantec Employee Engagement Fund, an advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation*
Tara Health Foundation
Tilburg University
UBS Optimus Foundation
UK Aid
United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID)
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
United States Department of Labor
University of California, Davis
University of California, San Diego
University of Cape Town
University of Michigan
University of Toronto
University of Zurich
Vanguard Charitable Endowment Fund
Varkey Foundation
Village Enterprise
VOTO Mobile
Wageningen University and Research
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
World Bank
World Bicycle Relief
World Vision, Inc.

*These organizations provided employee matching gifts.

Donors

$100,001+
Anonymous (4)

$50,001-$100,000
Anonymous (1)
Bruce F. Campbell*
Russell & Elizabeth Siegelman

$25,001-$50,000
Anonymous (3)
Anonymous (1)*
Trey Beck
Cedomir Crnkovic & Valerie Rubsamen
Dean & Cindy Karlan
Amit & Vicky Patel

$10,001-$25,000
Anonymous
Ben Blumenfeld & Jocelyn Ross
Ronald & Lingfeng Cheng
Ross Garon & Hong Kyung Suh
Peter & Natalie Gruenstein
James Hudspeth
The Thomas & Nettie Keck Family
Miles H. & G. Elizabeth Lasater*
The LeRoux Family Charitable Fund*
The O’Brien Family Charitable Fund
David Rademeyer & Marguerite Hoyler
Ferrill D. & E. Belinda Roll*
Neela Saldanha & Tanuj Suri
Stephen Toben

$5,001-$10,000
Wendy Abt
Zafer Barutcuoglu
Heather & Benjamin Grizzle
James M. & Jennifer L. Hall
Paul von Hippel
Zachary Jefferson
Alfred Lewis

Lowe/Lowenhaupt Family Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation
Vincent & Elisa de Martel
Spencer Maynes
Liz & George Pavlov
Paul Stowell
Colin Teichholtz & Stella Um
Eric Joseph Uhrhane*

$2,501-$5,000
Anonymous (5)
Anonymous (1)*
Silicon Valley Community Foundation on behalf of Anonymous
John Benninghoff
Joy Bonaguro & Justin Elstrott
Daniel Culley
Joe Delmonico
Duane & Subarna Hamid Eisaman
Elaine & Tim Fitzgibbon*
Peter Gourley & Ruth Ann Woodley
Steven Hakusa
Laura Hattendorf & Andrew Kau
Alexandra & Brian Hawkins
Elizabeth Holmes
David Joerg
Thomas John & Sajama Sajama
Carter Jones
The Betty L. West Mending Fund of the Tides Foundation
Patrick Peterson & Shirley Tsai
Lauren Schmidt
Gregg & Kimberly Sciabica
Mason Smith
Thomas West

$1,000-$2,500
Anonymous (5)
Alexander Aganin
Shannah D. Albert

Marcelle V. Arak
Jenny & Joe Arcidicono
Tanwa Arpornthip
William M. & Pamela W. Bass*
Alan Batkin
William Bench
Jeffrey Braemer
Charles Brickman
Adam Bromwich
Isaac Brooks
Jim & Sharon Butler in honor of Christine & Steve Graham
M. Patrick Campbell & Yasmine Mahdavi
Anastasia Chen
Robert Choo
Rosalind Chow & Jeff Galak Charitable Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation
Allan & Joyce Cohen
Michael Day
David Dayen
Chad DeChant
Richard & Vanessa Deutschmann
Brian Dietel
Annie Duflo
Bruce Engelbert
Melissa Feinberg & Ken Gottesman
Janet Freeman & Paul Solman
Andrew Funderburk
Adam Grant
Paul Gruenwald
Michael Jesse Handelman*
Nate Hansen
Christopher & Olga Hartwell
Samy Hernandez
R. Alexander Hetherington
William Higgins
Kellie D. Hobbs
John Hughes
Amy Hunter
Cornelia van Ineveld

Nathan Jensen & Sophie Fortin
David Kaplan
Sterling Keener
Adam Kim
Michael Kim
Julio Kogut
Stefan Krasowski
David Lichtenstein & Rebecca Silver
Mark & Joni Light
Matthijs oude Lohuis
Matthew Maas
Dwight Mathis
Janet McCubbin
Christine Meyer
Evie Naufal
Daniel Newlon
Christopher O’Brien
Jameson Op de Coul
Preeti Pachaury
Kristov Paulus
Rachel Rankin
Peter Rigano
Shelley Roth & Jed Weissberg
Christophe Roux
Lisa Sawin
Cecelia Schmieder
Christopher Schneider
Elizabeth Schodek
Noah Segal
Stephen C. Senna
Joseph Shalleck
Robert & Virginia Shiller
Amro Shohoud
Bonita Singal
Joseph Torella
Justin Truman
Quynhnhu Vu
Angus Walker
Mary Wootters
Scott Yak
The Zaitlin-Nienberg Family Fund

Note: Gift levels reflect funds received in 2016, not multi-year pledges.
*Gifts from these donors were made via the Vanguard Charitable Endowment Fund.

Finances

IPA 2016 Revenue Graph
IPA 2015 Expenses Graph

Note: Percentages calculated using exact amounts rather than rounded amounts.

Net Assets

End of 2015: ($8.79 million)
End of 2016: ($4.12 million)
Change in Net Assets: $4.67 million

See our full, audited financials at poverty-action.org/financials

Leadership and Offices

Senior Management Team

Annie Duflo
Executive Director

Lucy Berkowitz
Chief Financial and Administrative Officer

Stacey Daves-Ohlin
General Counsel and Chief Human Resources Officer

Bruce Hickling
Chief Programs Officer

Pam Kingpetcharat
Chief Information Officer

Imran Matin
Chief Research and Policy Officer

Board of Directors

Wendy Abt
Founder, WPA, Inc.

Benjamin S. Appen, CFA
Founding Partner, Co-Chair of Investment Committee,
and CEO of Magnitude Capital

Trey Beck, CFA
Chairman, IPA Board of Directors and
Former Head of Investor Relations, D. E. Shaw

Heather W. Grizzle
Founding Partner, Causeway Strategies

Laura Hattendorf
Head of Investments, Mulago Foundation

Dean Karlan
Founder of IPA and Professor of Economics
and Finance, Northwestern University

Daniel Michalow
Managing Director, D. E. Shaw

James J. Prescott
Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School

Stephen Toben
Vice Chairman, IPA Board of Directors
and President, Flora Family Foundation

Kentaro Toyama
W.K. Kellogg Associate Professor of Community Information, University of Michigan School of Information

Ankur Vora
Director, Strategy, Innovation, and Impact,
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Country Programs

Bangladesh
Ashraf Haque, Country Representative
Apt. #6B, House #35, Road #7, Block G, Banani, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh

Burkina Faso & Mali
Nicoló Tomaselli, Country Director
Sector 53, Lot 53, Parcel 01, Section A.
Mailing Address: 01 BP 492 Ouagadougou 01 – Burkina Faso

Colombia & Dominican Republic
Sebastián Chaskel, Country Director
Calle 98 No. 22-64 Of 307 Bogotá, Colombia

Côte d’Ivoire
Henriette Hanicotte, Research Manager
& Country Representative
House number 167, Ilot 14, Lot 77,
Quartier Val Doyen, Cocody, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire
Postal Address: 16 BP 427 Abidjan 16

Ghana
Madeleen Husselman, Country Director
House # C149/14 2nd Dzorwulu Crescent,
Dzorwulu, Accra, Ghana
PMB 57, Osu–Accra, Ghana

Kenya
Suleiman Asman, Country Director
Sandalwood Lane off Riverside Drive (Next to Sandalwood Apartments), Nairobi, Kenya Postal Address: P.O. Box 72427-00200

Liberia
Osman Siddiqi, Country Director
MAYA Building 1st Floor, Russell Avenue,
10th and 11th Streets Sinkor, Monrovia, Liberia

Malawi
Carly Farver, Country Representative
Area 47/3/249 Lilongwe, Malawi
P.O. Box 31093, Lilongwe 3, Lilongwe, Malawi

Myanmar
Ricardo Morel, Country Director
28 Mau Pin Street #8F
Sanchaung Township,
Yangon, Myanmar

Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay
Juan Manuel Hernández-Agramonte,
Country Director
Jr. España (Ex Manuel Gonzalez de la Rosa) N°396, Magdalena del Mar. Altura Cdra. 30 de la Av. Salaverry, Lima, Peru

Philippines
Nassreena Sampaco-Baddiri, Country Director
Unit B 8th Floor Belvedere Tower, San Miguel Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig City, 1605, Philippines

Rwanda
Doug Kirke-Smith, Country Director
#32 KG 601 Remera, Kigali, Rwanda
P.O. Box 6161 Kigali, Rwanda

Sierra Leone
Osman Siddiqi, Country Director
20B Wilkinson Rd, 3rd Floor,
Freetown, Sierra Leone

Tanzania
Rachel Steinacher, Country Representative
Regent Business Park (behind Shoppers Plaza),
P.O. Box 23408, 3rd Floor, Wing-B,
Plot 172, Chwaku Road
Mikocheni, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Uganda
Damien Kirchhoffer, Country Director
Physical Address: Plot 21 Kanjokya Street;
P.O. Box 40260, Kamwokya, Kampala, Uganda
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 40260, Nakawa, Kampala, Uganda

United States – Headquarters
101 Whitney Ave, 2nd Fl
New Haven, CT 06510 USA

Zambia
Kris Cox, Regional Director
Plot 26, Mwambula Street, Jesmondine, Lusaka, Zambia

Credits

Photos (in order of appearance, from left to right, top to bottom): Tom Gilks, Will Boase, Nate Barker, Francisco Anzola, Esther Havens / Living Goods, Intersect, Loïc Watine, Paul Smith, Alex Coutts, Tom Gilks

Designers: David Batcheck, Cara Vu
Lead Writer: Laura Burke
Writers and Editors: Heidi McAnnally-Linz, Bethany Park

Icons: Alfredo Hernandez, Bruno Landowski, Dara Ullrich, Eugene Dobrik, Megan Mitchell, misirlou, Ramakrishna Venkatesan, Rudy Jaspers, Sergey Demushkin, Yu Luck (The Noun Project); Alexander Kahlkopf (iconmonstr)

Irrigating Cucumber Crop in Rwanda